hanging accessory organizer. diy.

Just recently I did a little sprucing up in the kid’s bathroom which is also our main bath. I kept coming across all of those little things that almost 10 year old girls tend to accumulate and throw into drawers. In addition to buying a few drawer organizers, I thought it wouldn’t hurt (and it might be fun) to provide her with another way to not only stay organized but keep things easily accessible. In other words, something that will hopefully help the drawers stay cleaner longer. 🙂

Materials & Supplies:

  • 1/2 yard of canvas fabric (or another type of heavyweight fabric)
  • 1/4 yard of clear vinyl – medium to heavy gauge
  • Dowel (I used 3/8 inch round and cut it down to around 21 inches long)
  • 2 dowel caps (3/8 inch hole)
  • Upholstery thread
  • Scissors
  • Sewing machine
  • Cutting mat, clear cutting ruler and rotary cutter
  • Rope, ribbon or string (for hanging organizer)

*Optional: paint, paintbrush, painters tape, grommets

Instructions:

Step 1: Cut fabric and vinyl pieces. The size and dimension of your organizer is entirely up to you. Keep in mind the space you have available and the materials you have on hand (how much fabric and vinyl you have, the size of your dowel, etc). I cut my canvas down to 18″ wide by 60″ long (this was already the width of the fabric so I just kept the finished edges and went with it). For the vinyl, I cut two pieces 8″ tall by 17″ long, one piece 8″ tall by 6″ long, and one piece 8″ tall by 10″ long. These will be my pockets. When cutting your vinyl pieces/ pockets, keep in mind what types of items you will be storing in your organizer (example: bigger items, bigger pockets). I also mention later on how you can make a bigger pocket multiple pockets by doing an extra stitch. This is your chance to really customize your organizer!

*The final size of my finished organizer is 30″ long by 17.5″ wide.

Step 2: Finishing edges. In order to avoid fraying edges. Fold and iron down 1/4 inch of fabric on all unfinished edges. Then sew the edges. (refer to photo below)

Step 3: Create pocket for dowel. Fold your canvas fabric in half and place your dowel in the fold. Roughly pin down where you should sew your pocket for the dowel making sure that all edges of your canvas are even with each other. (refer to photo below) Remove dowel and then sew pocket. Mine was approximately 1″ from the fold.

Step 4: Sew the front and back of your folded canvas fabric together. Once you have sewn your pocket for the dowel, pin and sew the two halves of your folded canvas together. You will really only need to sew along your sides and bottom. There is no right or wrong way to do this, just make sure you don’t sew your pocket shut.

Step 5 (optional): Paint design. This step is fun but definitely not required. My intention was to add a little color while keeping the design and painting relatively simple. I used painters tape and taped off some areas underneath where my vinyl pockets would be and painted them with a color that would somewhat match the bathroom. Once the paint is dry, remove the tape. (refer to photo below)

Step 6: Layout and sew pockets. You want to make sure that the vinyl pockets you cut earlier fit the layout of your canvas and your design. Once you have your pocket layout determined, pin down your first pocket into place. (refer to photo below) Then sew your pocket onto your canvas. Repeat with each pocket. If you have a bigger pocket, you can always make it smaller once it is sewn on by stitching a line down the pocket to create a seperation in the pocket. Make sure you don’t sew the tops of your pockets closed. And feel free to reinforce your stitches at their start and stop points by reversing and forwarding over them once or twice.

Step 7: Finishing touches. Once all of your pockets are sewn on, you can add your finishing touches. I added four screw on grommets at the bottom (for necklaces and bracelets). I then placed my dowel back in its pocket, added dowel caps, tied on a piece of thin rope for hanging and tied on some decorative tassel trim to each side. (refer to photo below)

Total cost: around $12

Total time: 2 hours (give or take some depending on whether you partake in the painting step or not)

The windows are open and the sun is shining. Have a beautiful first weekend of Spring!

~xoxo~

diy spring flowers. made with fabric scraps.

Happy Monday!

March happens at the end of this week- yay!!! I love the transformation the earth seems to take on during the days of this “still winter yet start of spring” month. In the home, I’ve been craving more color and vibrance. And for myself, I’m already noticing that little extra energy one seems to get at the start of a new season.

It’s no secret that I love paper and fabric almost as much as the smell of a new bebé! I always seem to have bunches of both lying around. Last week, I saw a beautiful photo of one of these rain soaked and it prompted me to try the below. And even though mine turned out really looking nothing like my inspiration source, I enjoyed the time I spent making them. They were simple enough that my mind could wander and relax. Not to mention, they’ll add a little extra “pretty” to baskets and gifts come Easter!

Since I just made this up as I went along, there really is no right or wrong way to do them. Feel free to put your own twist on them or add your own details. My main goal was to just keep them simple (and inexpensive) by only needing a few supplies and those supplies being things I already had on hand.

Supplies needed:

  • Small foam or paint brush & Scissors
  • Fabric scraps – torn into strips (bigger or smaller depending on what size flower you are wanting to make)
  • Mod Podge or diluted Elmer’s glue (or fabric stiffener) I had the fabric stiffener but I love and prefer the texture that the mod podge gives the fabric once it dries.

Step 1:

Tear your scraps into strips. Mine were about 1 to 1 1/2 inches wide. You don’t want to get too wide because they will be harder to tie and shape. The length can really be any length. I tore my strips and then cut them in half (but because I was using scraps the lengths varied). Just remember the longer your strips the bigger your flowers will be. For solid flowers, I used 10-15 strips of the same color for each flower and then I tore some small strips (1/2 inch wide or so) for the inner part of the flower. I just used one small strip per flower for the center. I also tore one to two wider green strips per each flower (for the leaves).

Step 2:

Cover your workspace with parchment paper or old newspaper and then lay all of your strips out flat. Use your brush to cover each strip with mod podge (or glue substance) so that they are completely covered. Once all tops are dry, turn them all over and cover the bottom of each strip and let that side dry completely as well. If you want flowers with less stiffness, only cover one side or use less mod podge.

*do not mod podge your smaller center strips at this time.

(All of these strips of solid color fabric reminded me of when used to do the winding of the maypole every spring in elementary school 🙂 )

Step 3:

In really no right or wrong way, criss cross the strips you have chosen for your flower over each other. Use a small scrap or strip to tie the strips together (this one does not need to be mod podged or stiffened). Lay it over the flower as shown below.

Step 4:

Use one hand to hold the strips in place while you turn them over to knot the small strip. From here you really can do no wrong. This is when you you pull, rumple, fold, etc. each “petal” of the flower. The more you mess with them the more texture and life you create.

Step 5:

Once the flower is to your liking, find the center and flatten it. Brush a good amount of mod podge onto the center area of your flower. Then take a small center strip and crumple or ruffle it between your fingers. At this time generously coat it in mod podge so that it stays together and then place and press it in the flattened center. See below. Let it dry completely.

*you can also use hot glue to secure the center

Step 6:

If you want some “leaves” thread one or two strips through the knotted strip on the back or bottom of the flower. You can use these or some twine to secure the flower to baskets, wreaths, or anything else you want to add a little “spring” to!

Step 7:

The fun part! Use them to adorn or decorate whatever you please. They’re perfect for Easter baskets or wreaths! Or we are hanging onto our egg cartons, painting them and filling them with goodies to deliver to our neighbors during the Easter season so they will add a little extra “pretty” to them as well!

Yay for March! And Yay for Spring!

– XO!

a pretty spring mix. via an unlikely inspiration source.

As of late, while scrolling Facebook various Wal-Mart home decor ads keep popping up in my feed. In the past few weeks the ones that have caught my eye have been farmhouse, mid-century, and boho themed. I have been nicely surprised by some of the pretty furniture and decor that Wal-Mart is now carrying and/ or that you can order from other companies via the WM website. I feel like they have really upped their game. Maybe it’s been “upped” for awhile and I’m just now catching on. 🙂 These ads have caused me to detour to their website more than once in the past month. Because temps have been hovering in the low twenties here recently – spring is on my mind (and less than six weeks away)! Therefore, a pretty spring mix brought to you by Wal-Mart. Yes, Wal-Mart!

( hobnail canister // dotted pillowcase set // ribbed glass bowl )

( pink juice glasses // dining chair // jute rug )

( pom pom curtain // caged table light // amber canning jars )

( stoneware canister // string lights // round floral jute rug )

( kids sheet set // mod chairs // enamel bread box )

( drinking glasses // round mirror // succulents )

at home. signs of the season.

I love any day that involves a party especially Christmas day! But I’d say my most favorite thing about Christmas are those busy yet cozy days leading up to this “oh so special” day! The anticipation and the preparation make this one of the most beautiful times of the year to be at home and to enjoy all of the “signs” of the season. Tonight, I’m hoping to finish up one of my other favorite things – the wrapping of gifts! And this weekend, to make a few more treats. So far we’ve made this and this. Both were new recipes for me this year and both lovely!

I’m ever so hopeful you are and have been able to enjoy the signs of the season- whatever yours may be! XOXO!

advent calendar ‘18.

Happy December! Having lived in the south these past six years warming up hasn’t seemed possible since the weather has turned chilly here in Missouri. So all of the coffee and tea for me these days! 🙂

This year’s advent calendar is nothing out of the ordinary and a little haphazard, but it’s made with lots of “mom” love out of scraps of fabric that we have used for special occasions throughout the last few years. We just used the star fabric as a table covering at Tate’s first birthday celebration! Right now the kiddos may not care or even remember things such as this, but I’m hoping maybe all of these little parts that make a whole will bring back the fondest of memories for them one day!

The bags are filled with treats, small gifts, and cards with things we can do throughout the season to help remind us how lucky we are to have “us” (our cozy little family of five) and all of the other special people in this beautiful life God has blessed us with.

Speaking of memories and holiday crafts, these house ornaments will always be one of my holiday craft favorites. I made them right after we moved to a new house (in Alabama) and used fabrics that had been some of the kids old clothes, scraps from their quilts, curtains in our old house, etc. The numbers on the doors were their ages at the time. Darn it, time slow down!

All of the happy and merry to you and yours!